Daily reading

Today’s reading is: 2 Sam. 12:26-14:33; 1 Chr. 20:2-3

Video

2nd Samuel Chapter Twelve

(Outline continues from yesterday)

  1. Joab finishes the war that David should have been fighting, and gives David the glory (2nd Sam. 12:26-31).

2nd Samuel Chapter Thirteen

  1. David’s family woes begin with a sexual sin, followed by a murder (2nd Sam. 13:14,29).
  2. The primary adversary is Absalom (2nd Sam. 13:1).
    1. Absalom: my father is peace.  אַבְשָׁלֹום abiyshālowm #53.  אָב āb #1 + שָׁלֹום shālowm #7965: peace.  Of all David’s sons, only Absalom & Solomon are named for שָׁלֹום shālowm.
    2. The son of David & Maacah (oppression).  Maacah is the daughter of Talmai, King of Geshur.
  3. Tamar.  תָּמָר tāmār #8559: palm tree.
    Three OT women share this name: The daughter-in-law of Judah, mother of Perez & Zerah (Gen. 38:29,30); the sister of Absalom (2nd Sam. 13); a daughter of Absalom (2nd Sam. 14:27), whom some scholars identify with Maacah, the wife of Rehoboam (1st Kgs. 15:2).
  4. Amnon.  “Faithful.”  אַמְנׄון ’amnown #550.  אָמַן ’āman #539: to confirm, support.  First-born son of David, to Ahinoam the Jezreelitess (1st Sam. 25:43; 2nd Sam. 3:2).
  5. Amnon follows the advice of his cousin, Jonadab, and rapes his half-sister (2nd Sam. 13:1-14).
  6. Absalom takes his sister into his own home, as the first step in his rebellion against David (2nd Sam. 13:15-22).
  7. Absalom plots for two full years, and successfully assassinates the crown-prince of Israel (2nd Sam. 13:23-29).
  8. Like his father before him, Absalom will spend part of his life as a fugitive (2nd Sam. 13:37-39).  Unlike David’s fugitiveness, which was undeserved, Absalom is reaping what he has sown.

2nd Samuel Chapter Fourteen

  1. Joab recognized the conflict in David’s heart (2nd Sam. 14:1).
    1. His heart was inclined to Absalom (2nd Sam. 14:1).
    2. Justice required Absalom’s execution (Ex. 21:12-14).
    3. Joab was also a murderer (2nd Sam. 3:26-30), and yet one on whom David failed to administer justice (2nd Sam. 3:39; 1st Kgs. 2:5,6).
    4. Joab was also the agent of David’s murder of Uriah (2nd Sam. 11:15-18).
  2. Joab organizes a deception to imitate Nathan’s prophetic parable (2nd Sam. 14:2-20; cf. 12:1-14).
  3. David consents to Absalom’s return to Israel, but for two years does not consent to Absalom’s restoration to fellowship in the King’s court (2nd Sam. 14:21-24).
  4. Absalom is described, and every external indication is that he is the perfect successor to David (2nd Sam. 14:25-27), except for the fact that he is banned from David’s court (2nd Sam. 14:28-33).